ROASTED CITRUS DRUMSTICKS ON A BED OF COUSCOUS

When you have a beautiful canvas to work with, it makes things so much easier. And, that’s what happened with my North African inspired dish. I borrowed one of their popular staples (couscous) and allowed same to be a nest or bed for my citrus chicken drumsticks.

Couscous is uncooked semolina balls (likened to fine pasta). It has virtually no saturated fat and is loaded with potassium, protein, fiber, etc. A little goes a far way. Moreover, it is a a quick and easy dish to prepare.

In a stockpot, I added water, oil, bouillon, a pinch of salt and fresh thyme. Allowed same to come to a boil. Then, stirred raw couscous. Lid was added and this remained for five minutes, then couscous was fluffed with fork. To enhanced and flavored couscous  roasted veggies and dried cranberries were added.

ROASTED VEGETABLES
ROASTED VEGETABLES
COUSCOUS WITH ROASTED VEGGIES AND DRIED CRANBERRIERS
COUSCOUS WITH ROASTED VEGGIES AND DRIED CRANBERRIES

I served couscous with roasted citrus drumsticks along with garlic-flavored asparagus and broccoli.

ROASTED CITRUS DRUMSTICKS
ROASTED CITRUS DRUMSTICKS

My palate and I were in a beautiful place.

A HERBAL BOUQUET TRANSFORMED MY DISH – #PARSLEY/ALMOND PESTO SAUCE

One way to wake up a mundane dish is to go green. And, that’s what I did. I had a little left-over thinly chopped chicken tenderloin from a few days ago. On the onset,  I attempted to forego and do a new dish.  But, on second thoughts I decided to transform this humble left-over into something quite delicious and interesting.

I grabbed my food processor and decided to make yours truly a quick pesto sauce. Instead of basil which I didn’t have, I reached for my beautiful bouquet of parsley and pulled off a generous portion.

Fresh parsley
Fresh parsley

I placed same in my processor along with a couple of cloves of roasted garlic (did a quick steam/roast in the microwave), a few slivered almonds, salt, cracked black pepper and olive oil. I pulsed and married all the ingredients. It tasted so great I even added it a few spoons to some scrabbled eggs.

Sample of parsley/almond pesto sauce along with scrabbled eggs
Sample of parsley/almond pesto sauce along with scrabbled eggs

My mission was to make me dinner so I cooked me some whole wheat angel hair pasta. In the oven I did a quick roast of zucchini and tomatoes. In a skillet, I sautéed roughly chopped onions and a few pieces of bell peppers in a combination of coconut/olive oil. I made sure to season along with salt and pepper and a dash of dried basil.

I then drained my angel hair pasta making sure to reserve a little of the liquid in case I needed to build or liquefy my sauce. It was time; I added my delicious parsley/almond pesto to the pasta and carefully folded all the ingredients. I retrieved my left-over chicken and cut the pieces in thinner strips and tossed them in. As for the roasted veggies, they too became part of the mouth-watering dish.

Guys, that’s what beautiful things are made of. I garnished with a little chopped parsley and dived right in the amazing dish. Thanks to a bouquet of parsley.

TO EAT TILAPIA OR NOT TO EAT TILAPIA…..I DID!!

I’m always on the fence when it comes to the consumption of the fish, tilapia. You see, the fish is a fresh water kind. And that leaves me questioning the conditions they are farmed under. Now, can you imagine? I shouldn’t be even talking or pondering the thought that fish is farmed in perhaps my neighbor’s backyard. But, its reality.

Farming should be of vegetables and fruits. But, oh no, with this type of popular technique, we all at certain point in our lives have eaten fish of this sort (farmed raised). That makes me very wary. If I’m going eat my omega fatty acids in the form of seafood, can I please get it from the wild? Oh, no! I guess I’ve to be a fisher woman/person in order to nab my eats.My dear uncle was a fisher man in St. Elizabeth, Jamaica. It makes me thinking, why did I not learn the trade? Otherwise, I’ve to ‘fish out’ the $$$’s to purchase the wild kind.

So anyway, I bit the bullet and decided to purchase a couple of pieces of tilapia. In the back of my mind, I pondered, “now which yard were these pieces of tilapia raised? Were they kind to the breeding (or should I say the farming) of them?” They looked firm and didn’t smell like fish. And that’s a couple of tips the experts say you should look out for.

Anyway, I brought home my tilapia and tried my best to think of the wild. So, I did a quick pan-sear of them with a little olive oil; then set them aside. Oh, they smelled just like fish alright, and that’s how they should once the cooking process begins. I then set them aside and sauteed onions, juilenned bell peppers, and garlic. I then tossed in a few chopped olives and capers in order to get a little acid and added flavors. My tilapia pieces were then brought back to the skillet with a pat of butter and fresh squeeze of lemon.

Guys, I served my pan-seared tilapia with roasted broccoli and wedges of sweet and Irish potatoes. I confess, my omega fatty acid dish was delicious. By the way, I prayed and ate. Come to think of it, did I? I hope I did.